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WHAT’S CHANGED IN A POST-CORONAVIRUS WORLD?

WHAT’S CHANGED IN A POST-CORONAVIRUS WORLD?

WHAT’S CHANGED IN A POST-CORONAVIRUS WORLD?
July 28
08:02 2020

To The Point

By Gerry Pisciottano

WHAT’S CHANGED IN A POST-CORONAVIRUS WORLD?

As important as that question is, maybe a better one is, “What hasn’t changed?”

Businesses and their customers are or will be asking themselves, “What’s changed in a post-coronavirus world?” The answer to that question undoubtedly will vary, and it will change as time goes on. I do believe that, as much as things have changed and will continue to change, certain activities will remain the same.

Am I crazy? Is this a dream? It reminds me of the 1973 song by Led Zeppelin, “The Song Remains the Same,” and its opening lyrics, “I had a dream, oh, yeah, crazy dream.”

I don’t think I am crazy and, unfortunately, this is not a dream. As much as everything seems to have changed and continues to in our world, “The Song Remains the Same.” All businesses have some critical activities that enabled them to start and stay in business. The coronavirus and anything else that may come along will never (and I mean never) change these facts.

The basics

The first thing any business must do is market and promote itself. Yes, it’s as simple as that. A business must get the word out that they have a product or service to offer. The business needs to let the world know, “Hey, I am here and I have this product or service that you need.”

Since this crisis has hit, we are witnessing businesses change the way they advertise and promote. The paradigm shift we see so rapidly occurring should serve as a wake-up call to all of us. Adapt, change, overcome.

Businesses now operate using curbside pickup, delivery, virtual meetings, no-touch services and other innovative offerings. Businesses that are dependent on customers coming to their location are adapting with new procedures and processes to improve sanitation; control capacity, traffic flow, and interaction and proximity of customers and employees; incorporate the use of personal protective equipment; and more. This is the reality we are living in and will be living in for the foreseeable future.

Since this crisis has hit, we are witnessing businesses change the way they advertise and promote. The paradigm shift we see so rapidly occurring should serve as a wake-up call to all of us. Adapt, change, overcome.

The second thing that will never change for any business owner is obtaining and maintaining customers. Customers are the most valuable asset of a business (right next to its employees). Yes, I know this isn’t rocket science. But, hey, we have been told our entire lives that we should wash our hands, and now people are finally paying attention. Stick with me. Sorry, a self-indulgent moment.

Besides attracting new customers, a business needs to do everything possible to make sure current customers are satisfied with the product or service being provided. That requires communication. Every business needs to maintain communication with customers. This is even more important during times like these.

Existing customers may be the only thing that keeps a business alive to fight another day.

Extra hands

As someone who is in the business of helping others outsource non-revenue generating activities, I find myself being called on to help business leaders free up time to focus on these items. They realize—especially in today’s environment—that any time they spend on something other than marketing their business and communicating with their clients could very well jeopardize their ability to survive. The last thing they need to do is spend time on activities they can outsource for a reasonable fee.

Time is the most valuable resource for all of us. And that’s the very reason my industry exists. As professional employer organizations, we come alongside businesses and handle the employee-related administrative activities. PEOs all over the country help business owners focus on the most critical things: marketing their business and serving their clients. Nationwide, more than 3 million people are covered by PEO arrangements.

As an insurance professional, I know you are passionately interested in the well-being of every client you have. And that concern extends well beyond the insurance products you can sell them. I encourage you to explore our industry; educate yourself and your clients on the services a PEO can provide. See how outsourcing non-revenue generating activities can bring relief during today’s volatile environment and going forward. Your client’s future—and perhaps your own—may depend on it.

The author

Gerry Pisciottano is a consultant and licensed insurance agent who has advised and consulted business owners for over 30 years. Since 2011, he has represented Harbor America, a division of national PEO Vensure Employer Services. Harbor America offers human resources solutions, payroll administration, and access to affordable benefits, including those not typically provided by small businesses, such as 401(k) plans, health, dental, life insurance, dependent care, and more. Contact Gerry at (561) 718-1393 or gerry.pisciottano@hapeo.com.

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